Pepero Day

Since my last post a lot has happened. The past two weeks have been a heaping plate of interesting with a side of mundane and a hint of nostalgia. Despite what some Daegu inhabitants will tell you  I am becoming much more competent at the business of living in Korea.

Until late, updating this blog was not a chore, I actually looked forward to it. Now that I am more acquainted with the area and my coworkers,  my free time has become filled with studying Hangul, going out/playing soccer, and trying to get an adequate dose of American sports, especially the NBA. Speaking of which after a slow start the Utah Jazz are really starting to come together. Back-to-back come  from behind victories in Miami and Orlando? I’ll take it. Especially when Paul Milsap, a player known for his blue-collar work ethic and rebounding tenacity puts up 46 against the Big Three and their suffocating defense.

Work Schedule

My work hours are by no means traditional: Monday-Friday 2pm- 10pm. I dig the hours, but a few late nights turn into sleeping past noon which translates into not having enough time to really do anything other than eat, read the paper, and shower before teaching a full day. I have done a decent – but not impeccable – job of avoiding this seductive pattern. Strangely, we (teachers) are required to be in to work by 2pm, we have class preparation for  half an hour and then from 2:30 – 3:30 pm  we stuff our faces at lunch; at 3:30 pm we are back in the office for class prep and by 4 pm we are teaching our first class. Curious, I asked my coworkers on my second day why they don’t just have us come in at 3 pm and have class prep for an hour and eliminate the lunch hour altogether. They all said they wondered the same thing. It’s not that I terribly mind this schedule, but it feels off-kilter taking an hour break after only being there for 30 minutes- I liken it to pulling over to eat after driving only  half an hour on a 7 hour car ride.

The Banker

Last week I went to Daegu Bank, a one minute walk from my apartment if I have blisters on my feet from wearing running sneakers to play soccer and a thirty second stroll  if I am at top fitness, to transfer money from my Korean bank account into my U.S. account.  I recognized the gregarious gentleman who opened up my account about a month ago and sat down. During our first meeting he talked at length about his favorite American television dramas, like CSI and Law & Order, and before leaving he printed me out a map of the area and circled a few restaurants that he highly recommended (I went to one of them later that day and enjoyed my first bowl of kal-guk-su, one of my favorite dishes). He said he was happy to see me again and I said likewise. I practiced some Hangul phrases and expressions with him and he became very giddy. He proudly demonstrated that he got alerts of U.S. news stories in English on his I-Phone and then he showed me several framed pictures of his wife and kids that were displayed on his desk.  His English is not great but he can maintain a conversation and is able understand what I say if I slow down my pace.  After I exchanged some won into dollars he told me to wait one moment. When he came back he handed me a box of  Korean brand toothpaste. I asked if he was trying to give me a hint. He smiled without picking up on my insinuation and said he is happy to talk to me and would like to know me better and asked if I drank maekchu. I said only when forced and offered a wry smile. Song Choel  gave me his business card and highlighted his mobile number. I walked out thinking what a genuinely nice guy, why don’t Korean ladies give up their number this easily?

Pick-Up Soccer

Every Thursday after work a group of us rent out this outdoor turf field that is fenced in by massive netting and scrimmage from 11 pm until they tell us our time is up which is usually around 12:30 am. It’s great fun. I was never adroit with the ball but having been removed from the game for so many years the first few times playing was a little rough. “The touch of a rapist” is how an Englishman I work with described it. My conditioning is fine and I am more than able to keep up but beyond making a simple pass and playing solid defense I was not very serviceable. It did not help that I was playing in cross-trainers while everyone else had on cleats or turf boots. Fed up with being one of the last picked every week I made a trip to Homeplus, a Wal-Martesque place and invested in a pair of Diadora indoor soccer boots for 30,000 won, the equivalent of roughly $25. Granted they are not the highest quality, I felt like a new player during my first outing with them on. Who says  shoes don’t matter?

First Date

I had my first official date here in Korea a few weeks back. It went alright but there were no real fireworks. The highlight of the night was probably the makgeolli, which is a cloudy, milky-white wine made from rice; it’s dirt cheap and usually sold by the pot but at this place it was in bottles.

Pepero Day

November 11 is Pepero Day in South Korea. This monumental day celebrates a thin chocolate cookie stick.  11-11  represents a pack of  these tasty chocolate sticks. Get it? 1111! People hand out these treats to people they like. According to my students,  a guy is  supposed to give them to a girl he  is into.  I guess it is a lot like Valentines Day. Apparently they don’t have antitrust laws for this unofficial holiday because Pepero clearly has a  monopoly on the day. I thought this whole thing silly until the  nice-looking girl at the café who I often talk to gave me a pack of  Pepero cookie sticks. Now I am smitten by her.

Within the past week my students have said I look like the following mammals (usually  intended as an insult):

  • Gandhi
  • Obama
  • Kim Jung Un (Kim Jung Il’s fat son)
  • monkey
  • Bill Gates

I am convinced that they utter any non-Korean person that they know. As for the monkey reference, well, what can I say?

Last week I organized the students in some of my classes into teams for a trivia competition. Here are some of the team names that they chose:

  • Daniel’s face is in danger
  • Windows 7
  • Baldy
  • Thank you
  • SK
  • Jazz (my suggestion)
  • Kimchi now!
  • Daniel is under attack
  • Harry Potter in big cast

‘Daniel is under attack’ was stacked with some of the brightest students, winning in a route,  forcing me to give them a stamp in their workbooks.


Advertisements

, , , , , , ,

  1. #1 by Aein on November 11, 2010 - 9:47 pm

    Happy Pepero Day! 🙂

  2. #2 by Shaunta Lee on November 11, 2010 - 10:29 pm

    HAHAHAHA… Daniel’s face has been in danger for quite some time, to be fair.

  3. #3 by Michael A. Robson on November 12, 2010 - 12:39 am

    First date in Blog Form. Very cool. Congrats on getting to know the locals, looks like the guy at the bank was very helpful. 😉

    The toothpaste line is absolutely hilarious.

  4. #4 by Eleonora on January 9, 2011 - 5:52 am

    Hey there! Hope you enjoyed the Peppero day =) By the way, I really like your blog. I also write about Korea here:

    http://ellacino.blogspot.com/
    I would appreciate if you follow/leave

    comments regarding the posts or the blog

    itself.

    Thank you ~

    … and I’m gone reading other posts of

    yours. They are so fascinating!

    • #5 by Daniel Martin Katz on January 9, 2011 - 7:20 am

      Hey Eleonora, thanks for the comment. I have done an insufficient job of keeping up with the blog of late, but I have been stellar in the department of everything makkoli;) I’ll definitely check out what you have to say. Happy New Year!

  1. “Athletic” Day | The Adventures of Beckham Face

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: